Tyler Norris named first chief executive of the Institute for Mental Health and Wellness 

SEATTLE, Wash. and IRVINE, Calif.—Providence St. Joseph Health today announced that Tyler Norris, MDiv, will serve as the first chief executive of the Institute for Mental Health and Wellness. Norris most recently served as vice president of Total Health Partnerships at Kaiser Permanente, a leading health care provider and nonprofit health plan. Norris and others will join Maureen Bisognano, former president and CEO of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement, and now founding chair of the institute’s Advisory Council on Mental Health and Wellness, to identify and advance solutions that improve mental health and well-being in the U.S.

“We are proud to welcome Tyler Norris to the Institute for Mental Health and Wellness,” said Rod Hochman, M.D., CEO, Providence St. Joseph Health. “Tyler has spent much of his career advocating for the needs of our most vulnerable populations and shares our ambition to make communities healthier. His compassion and tenacity will help us change how mental health in the U.S. is perceived, diagnosed and treated.”

Norris is an entrepreneur and founder of more than a dozen businesses and social ventures. He has an extensive background in population health and community well-being, shaping health and sustainability initiatives in hundreds of communities around the nation, and collaborating with organizations including the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the Public Health Institute and the W.K. Kellogg Foundation. Norris also served as founding board chair of the Institute for People, Place and Possibility, co-creator of Community Commons, a mapping and reporting tool for improved community health and well-being.

“I am honored to be a part of this bold path toward healthier communities, addressing the mental, social and spiritual health of our nation,” said Norris. “The institute and what it has set out to do defines success in innovation – it’s convening like-minded activists and reducing the risk of trying new things. I look forward to joining the effort and challenging one of the biggest health and social justice issues facing our country today.”

The institute was founded as part of a larger commitment by Providence St. Joseph Health. In response to the growing mental health crisis in the U.S., the organization identified several core areas of focus to improve mental health care. It made an initial investment of $100 million to support advances in behavioral health, including awareness, diagnosis and treatment. The institute and other initiatives will be supported by this investment, which will facilitate the assembling of organizations and industry leaders, such as Norris and Bisognano. In his new role, Norris will shape the institute’s vision and strategic direction through community-based collaborations and partnerships. Norris will start at the institute in early 2017.

About Providence St. Joseph Health

Providence St. Joseph Health is committed to improving the health of the communities it serves, especially those who are poor and vulnerable. With 50 hospitals, 829 physician clinics, senior services, supportive housing and many other health and educational services, the health system and its partners employ more than 100,000 caregivers (employees) serving communities across seven states – Alaska, California, Montana, New Mexico, Oregon, Texas and Washington. With system offices based in Renton, Wash. and Irvine, Calif., Providence St. Joseph Health is the parent organization of Providence Health & Services and St. Joseph Health, enabling the family of organizations to work together to meet the needs of its communities, both today and into the future. Formed in 2016, the Providence St. Joseph Health family includes the founding organizations, and in: Texas, Covenant Health and Covenant Medical Group; California, Facey Medical Group, Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian and St. Joseph Heritage Healthcare; Washington, Kadlec Regional Medical Center, Pacific Medical Centers and Swedish Health Services.