Providence seeks single nursing vision across 5 states 

Deborah Burton, chief nursing officer 

“This was our single biggest communications event,” Burton says, adding that next year’s lecture will take place during National Nurses Week in May.

From NurseWeek
By John Leighty
Posted October 11, 2010

Providence Health & Services is putting a creative focus on the coordinated and compassionate patient care practiced by 16,000 nurses in a five-state, nonprofit healthcare system stretching from Anchorage, Alaska, to San Pedro, Calif.

Deborah Burton, RN, PhD, CNAA, vice president and CNO, who oversees the system’s RN activities from a network office in Renton, Wash., chose an Aug. 25 International Year of the Nurse ceremony to kick off a campaign aimed at inspiring a single nursing vision across a network of 27 hospitals and medical centers.

The event launched an annual distinguished nursing lecture series to be beamed systemwide via video teleconferencing, and coincided with the 100-year anniversary of the death of the founder of modern nursing, Florence Nightingale. The initial lecture, “Providence Nursing: A World of Caring,” was by Marla Salmon, RN, ScD, FAAN, dean of the University of Washington’s School of Nursing and an international expert on caring.

Nursing Roles Highlighted

“This was our single biggest communications event,” Burton says, adding that next year’s lecture will take place during National Nurses Week in May. “There’s something special about the nurses of Providence that we want to clarify and honor. Dr. Salmon talked about their heritage, workplace culture and future roles, and did so eloquently.”

In addition, a 7-minute video was released that highlights Providence RNs in a tribute featuring photos of nursing activities in Alaska, Washington, Montana, Oregon and California. The video shows how the Sisters of Providence, a Catholic healthcare ministry, opened the first permanent hospital in the Northwest in 1858, noting, “Doors opened, lives changed.”

“We produced this video to both recognize and thank Providence nurses for their contributions to our mission of caring and healing,” Burton says. “This is not a token thank-you, but an acknowledgement of what nurses are being thanked for. It is the mission of Providence made visible through nurses.”

View the Providence nursing video at http://wms29.streamhoster.com/otmills/yotn_7-30-10-.wmv.